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It's a win!

Our Galileo FOC Payloads team picked up a Sir Arthur Clarke award last night at the RIS Gala Dinner.
The 2016 Sir Arthur Clarke awards for Space Achievement – also known as “the Arthurs”  were presented at the Reinventing Space Gala Dinner, held at the Royal Society in London on 27th October.

We are delighted that SSTL's Galileo FOC Payloads team won the Industry/Project award in recognition of their achievement in designing and building 22 of the payloads for the Galileo GNSS Constellation.  The Galileo FOC payloads contain the timing and positioning "brains" of each satellite and each one has taken approximately 6 weeks to complete, with a dedicated team here at SSTL working on the assembly, subcontract management, and project management.  We are looking forward to the next launch of 4 Galileo satellites onboard Ariane 5 in November.  

One of our young engineers, Alizee Malavart,  was also shortlisted for the Industry/Project individual award - it was an achievement to be shortlisted and an honour to lose out to Dave Honess who spearheaded the Astro Pi project.  

The Awards were presented by Helen Sharman.

Elizabeth Rooney collecting the Industry/Project Team Award from Helen Sharman

The Award will be coming back to Guildford for display in our Reception cabinet - look out for it when you visit!

Flat-pack Major Tim joins the SSTL table.

The 2016 Arthurs winners

Thanks to the British Interplanetary Society for organising the Arthurs; it was an honour to be on the shortlist with our colleagues across the UK space sector.  
 

 

 
 

 

 

28 October 20160 Comments1 Comment

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