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Nano-satellite competition finalist

Following our recent spate of nano-sat news, SSTL has been announced as one of the finalists in the first-ever Nano-satellite Constellation Mission Idea Contest. The contest is organised by Japanese based Axelspace and SSTL is in stiff competition with organisations such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Mitsubishi Electric Corporation. The Nano-satellite Mission Idea Contest The objective of the competition is to encourage innovative exploitation of nano-satellites in constellations to provide useful and sustainable capabilities, services or data. SSTL’s Mission Concepts Engineer Richard Long has proposed the Distributed Multi-Spectral Imaging System (DiMSIS), demonstrating the feasibility of low cost nano-technology that can rival current technologies in many ways. The DiMSIS is able to support applications such as agriculture, disaster relief, cartography, national security and Earth Sciences; meeting both humanitarian and scientific needs. Given the recent earthquake events in New Zealand, floods in Australia and the high level of seismic activity of Japan, disaster monitoring is an especially important application in the Asia Pacific region. The SSTL competition entry is focusing on how a nano-satellite system can be used in a similar way to the Disaster Monitoring Constellation, demonstrating how critical features of the constellation can be adapted in this new era of miniaturisation with minimal impact on the resulting system’s performance.

 

 
 

 

 

11 March 20110 Comments1 Comment

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