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Low cost satcoms under the microscope

In October 2010 SSTL kicked off a reliability study for the European Space Agency (ESA) in partnership with BAE Systems, looking at alternative approaches to designing and analysing system-level reliability for low cost telecommunications missions. ARTES-1 is the preparatory element to the Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) programme. The ARTES-1 programme is fully funded by ESA and enables European and Canadian industry to explore innovative concepts to produce leading-edge satellite communications products and services through research and development activities. The study will conclude in the first half of 2012 and will propose alternative reliability prediction methods for the design, development and analysis of space systems within the European space industry in general - and low cost telecommunications satellites in particular. SSTL is developing a new cost effective telecommunications satellite under the name GMP (Geostationary Minisatellite Platform), currently capable of accommodating payloads of up to 32 transponders requiring up to 3kW of power, and being enhanced to accommodate up to 44 transponders / 4.5kW of power. The GMP’s origins lie in the British National Space Centre’s (now superseded by the UK Space Agency) MOSAIC programme. Work completed under MOSAIC (MicrO Satellite Applications In Collaboration) enabled SSTL to develop GIOVE-A for ESA, the first satellite of the European GNSS constellation launched in 2005 and still operational. At an orbital height of over 23,000 km, GIOVE-A also constituted a successful first move "beyond LEO" for the company. Drawing upon BAE Systems’ experience in system reliability and SSTL’s cost effective design methodologies, the study project team will produce a set of guidelines to evaluate the reliability of low cost design approaches to telecommunications missions of varying size and complexity.

 

 
 

 

 

31 January 20110 Comments1 Comment

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