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New satellite image of Somerset floods from UK-DMC2

This latest image is of the area around Bridgwater in Somerset, UK where there has been extensive flooding of the River Parrett.
Bridgwater can be seen near the coast, with flooding occuring upstream.  An earth bank is being built to protect the town from further flooding (BBC News Online, 10/02/2014)

Glastonbury can be seen to the east (right in the image), with Glastonbury Tor a high point in the landscape. 

Flooding around Bridgwater, Somerset, UK. Click to enlarge. Credit UK-DMC2 image @ DMCii 2014. All rights reserved.

This is a false-colour image at 22 metres resolution and at a swath width of 600km, which is extremely useful for flood monitoring. 

The International Charter: Space and Natural Disasters has been activated by the UK three times since December 2013.  UK-DMC2, designed and manufactured by SSTL, and owned by UK imaging company DMCii, continues to supply images of the UK floods to the Disasters Charter.

The Charter allows national civil protection authorities to access a pool of free satellite data to assist with immediate disaster relief operations, and for creating accurate maps of at-risk areas for future mitigation plans. Many space agencies are contributing members of the Charter, supplying satellite data with a range of resolutions and swath widths. The UK Space Agency is a contributor to the Charter, working with SSTL’s subsidiary DMCii, to provide data from 4 spacecraft in the Disaster Monitoring Constellation. Since the Charter activation for the UK storms, DMCii has provided satellite data over a range of locations. 

 

 
 

 

 

11 February 20140 Comments1 Comment

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