By continuing to use this site, you agree to the use of cookies. You can find out more by following this link Accept & Close ›
SSTL
Space Blog

SSTL wins new Galileo contract

Last week it was announced that SSTL and its German partner OHB System AG have won a contract to build the next 8 satellites for the EU’s Galileo satellite navigation programme. Prime contractor OHB will be constructing the satellites and SSTL will assemble, integrate and test the navigation payloads in its new Kepler facility in Guildford.
CEO of Arianespace Jean-Yves Le Gall, Universities and Science Minister David Willetts, Executive chairman of SSTL Sir Martin Sweeting and Vice president of the EC in charge of Industry and entrepreneurship Antonio Tajani
CEO of Arianespace Jean-Yves Le Gall, Universities and Science Minister David Willetts, Executive chairman of SSTL Sir Martin Sweeting and Vice president of the EC in charge of Industry and entrepreneurship Antonio Tajani
The contract was announced in London by Antonio Tajani, Vice President of the European Commission in charge of Industry and Entrepreneurship. SSTL’s Executive Chairman Sir Martin Sweeting and CEO Matt Perkins were joined at the event by Universities and Science Minister David Willetts and members of the European Space Agency (ESA). This contract builds on SSTL’s nine years of experience with the Galileo project. The consortium is currently working on the construction of 14 satellites for the constellation the first of which are due for completion at the end of this year.
SSTL Executive Chairman, Sir Martin Sweeting
SSTL Executive Chairman, Sir Martin Sweeting
SSTL’s payloads are based on European-sourced atomic clocks, navigation signal generators, high power travelling wave tube amplifiers and antennas and will provide a system that is interoperable with both the American GPS system and the Russian GLONASS system. The contract announcement is not the only recent development in the Galileo system. On January 27th the Czech government signed an agreement with the European GNSS Agency (GSA) for the headquarters of the Galileo system to be moved to Prague later in 2012. Also Arianespace, the company in charge of launching the Galileo satellites, signed an agreement last week with ESA announcing the possibility of using Ariane 5 launchers to deploy Galileo satellites after 2014. Ariane 5 launchers can carry 4 satellites at a time while the Soyuz rockets currently used for Galileo carry 2.
Executive chairman of SSTL Sir Martin Sweeting, CEO of Arianespace Jean-Yves Le Gall, CEO of OHB-System AG Marco R Fuchs, Chairman of OHB-System AG Professor Manfred Fuchs, Vice president of the EC in charge of Industry and entrepreneurship Antonio Tajani and Universities and Science Minister David Willetts
Executive chairman of SSTL Sir Martin Sweeting, CEO of Arianespace Jean-Yves Le Gall, CEO of OHB-System AG Marco R Fuchs, Chairman of OHB-System AG Professor Manfred Fuchs, Vice president of the EC in charge of Industry and entrepreneurship Antonio Tajani and Universities and Science Minister David Willetts
SSTL is proud to be playing a pivotal role in Europe’s next generation satellite navigation programme. Follow our blog to find out more about SSTL’s involvement! The Full Operational Capability phase of the Galileo programme is managed and fully funded by the European Union. The Commission and ESA have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission. The views expressed in this blog can in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Union and/or ESA. "Galileo" is a trademark subject to OHIM application number 002742237 by EU and ESA.

 

 
 

 

 

08 February 20120 Comments1 Comment

Back to Blog

Comments
Blog post currently doesn't have any comments.
 Security code

About This Blog

SSTL's lowdown on cost effective space technology, small satellites, space science and interplanetary exploration.

Post Archive

October 2017(1)
May 2017(1)
January 2017(2)
October 2016(3)
September 2016(1)
July 2016(1)
June 2016(1)
April 2016(1)
March 2016(4)
February 2016(3)
December 2015(2)
November 2015(3)
October 2015(3)
July 2015(1)
May 2015(0)
May 2015(1)
April 2015(1)
March 2015(2)
February 2015(2)
January 2015(2)
December 2014(1)
November 2014(2)
October 2014(2)
September 2014(1)
July 2014(2)
June 2014(3)
May 2014(1)
April 2014(1)
March 2014(1)
February 2014(2)
January 2014(2)
November 2013(3)
October 2013(2)
September 2013(2)
July 2013(3)
June 2013(2)
May 2013(2)
April 2013(4)
March 2013(1)
February 2013(3)
January 2013(5)
December 2012(6)
November 2012(5)
October 2012(4)
September 2012(4)
August 2012(1)
July 2012(6)
June 2012(1)
May 2012(2)
April 2012(5)
March 2012(3)
February 2012(3)
January 2012(1)
December 2011(1)
November 2011(4)
October 2011(5)
September 2011(4)
August 2011(3)
July 2011(4)
June 2011(6)
May 2011(3)
April 2011(1)
March 2011(3)
February 2011(2)
January 2011(3)
December 2010(2)
November 2010(1)
October 2010(2)
September 2010(4)
August 2010(4)
July 2010(2)
June 2010(2)
May 2010(2)
April 2010(4)
March 2010(4)
February 2010(4)
January 2010(3)
December 2009(2)
November 2009(5)
October 2009(2)
September 2009(6)
August 2009(4)
July 2009(3)
June 2009(1)
May 2009(2)
March 2009(2)
February 2009(5)
January 2009(2)
December 2008(3)
November 2008(6)
October 2008(5)
September 2008(3)
August 2008(5)
June 2008(1)
May 2008(3)
April 2008(5)
March 2008(1)
February 2008(1)
January 2008(3)
December 2007(3)
November 2007(6)
October 2007(3)
September 2007(3)
August 2007(1)
July 2007(1)
June 2007(2)
May 2007(2)
April 2007(1)
January 2007(3)
December 2006(1)
September 2006(1)
May 2006(2)
January 2006(1)
December 2005(7)

Show/Hide All

If you like Space Blog, why not subscribe by RSS by clicking the subscribe button, or to recieve updates by email click the subscribe by email button.


*Comments Policy
SSTL reserves the right not to publish comments if they are deemed inappropriate.